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Dec 11, 2012 10:00am PST
take on what we've just heard from governor snyder and also the current state of the fiscal cliff negotiations in washington is our colleague and friend ruth marcus from "the washington post." columnist for "the washington post." ruth, this whole issue in the midwest, this used to be most likely in the southern states, but this really is moving, and we're seeing a real decline in union household membership about half what it was 40 years ago. it used to be 24%. now it's 11.8%. >> unions are reeling, and the more states that enact measures like this, the more unions will be reeling. their penetration, the private sector is something like 7% of the private sector work force is unionized, and i have to say -- i don't use words like this very often, i thought some of the governor's comments were kind of orwelian to suggest this was a pro-worker move. it's clearly a move that may help businesses, but what a kick in the teeth to autoworkers unions, who as you correctly point d out, gave a lot back to help the auto industry get back on its feet, the notion that we had to do this now with
Dec 7, 2012 10:00am PST
politics, the fiscal cliff. are we ever going to be able to enjoy a holiday season in washington? joining me for a look at the week that was, susan page, "usa today's" washington bureau craze, chris freights, congressional correspondent for the national journal and the white house correspondent for npr. thanks to all of you. susan, first to you, you've been watching all the body language from the speaker and the president. now at least they're in direct talks. could we get the grand bargain that was aborted a year ago? >> i'm not sure we're going to get the grand bargain, the one with the big pieces that kind of get us on a path so we don't have to revisit these issues in this way, but i think it looks more likely we're going to get a deal that will prevent us from going off the fiscal cliff and probably going to be a deal that the white house will be happy with. i think it's increasingly clear that the white house has the upper hand, they're better off if -- they're better off than republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. they have leverage from the campaign. that's the directionion -
Dec 12, 2012 10:00am PST
that so-called fiscal cliff. in our new nbc news/wall street journal poll just out for us today, most americans say they want compromise. joining me here for our daily fix, chris, msnbc contributor and managing editor of the fiscal cliff, the people that we polled, americans get it. they want, two-thirds of them, 65% say they want a deal to be done. they want compromises even if it means targeted entitlement cuts and tax increases. >> yeah, and i don't think we should be terribly surprised by that, andrea. the truth of the matter is over the last decade or so what we've seen is congress, really, because of redistricting and other things like that, members of congress don't tend to have to represent the middle of the country. they wind up representing their two-party bases, the people that deeply disagree. democratic base does not want entitlement cuts, republican base does not want to raise taxes. but people in general like the idea congress can get something done on something big. now, i would say there's a little bit of devil in the details. the question does ask a
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3